CFP: PONTORMO AND ROSSO

by Webmaster on December 3, 2013

PONTORMO AND ROSSO FIORENTINO: COURT ARTISTS IN TURMOIL
Florence, 4 April 2014. A one-day conference organized by Andrea M. Gáldy with Lauren Johnson and held at the British Institute of Florence to accompany the exhibition “Pontormo and Rosso. The Diverging Paths of Mannerism.” The exhibition curated by Carlo Falciani and Antonio Natali will run from 8 March-20 July 2014 at Fondazione Palazzo Strozzi. Jacopo Pontormo (Jacopo Carrucci) and Rosso Fiorentino (Giovanni Battista di Jacopo di Gasparre) trained with the Florentine painter Andrea del Sarto in the early years of the sixteenth century. During these politically turbulent years after the French invasion and the cacciata of the Medici, diverse Florentine governments for and against the Medici rose and fell while two Medici popes ruled over an increasingly rebellious Christendom. Rosso eventually left Florence for Rome and, after the Sack of the Eternal City, moved to Northern Italy and finally to France where he worked at the court at Fontainebleau. Pontormo stayed in Florence apart from a visit to Rome. Sponsored by some of the leading families of Florence, such as the Capponi and the Borgherini, he also received intermittent patronage by the Medici. Eventually he became of the main artists at Cosimo I de’ Medici’s developing court during the early years of the young duke’s rule. Rosso (with Primaticcio) founded the School of Fontainebleau, whereas Pontormo established a “dynasty” of Mannerist court painters through his successors Agnolo Bronzino and Alessandro Allori. Both Rosso and Pontormo were responsible for the development of a new painterly style, the early maniera, which was much influenced by the art of Michelangelo. Religious reform and violent political events, such as the Sack of Rome and the siege of Florence by imperial troops in 1530, have been used to explain the radical departure from High Renaissance art. As young men Rosso and Pontormo set out to revolutionise art; their religious works of art, in particular, were considered to be either highly original or downright controversial. This one-day conference seeks to explore the oeuvre of the two artists, surviving as well as lost, with a special focus on the works of art brought together for display at the show at Palazzo Strozzi in spring 2014. This conference is intended as an interdisciplinary forum for discussion in which Pontormo and Rosso Fiorentino specialists will present new research alongside experts from other fields who wish to take their findings to the art of Early Florentine Mannerism. Please apply with a short abstract and bio (max. 200 words each) to the organizers. Deadline 15 December 2013.

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