IAS at Kalamazoo

Each year, the IAS sponsors three linked sessions at the annual meeting of the International Congress on Medieval Studies (ICMS). The Congress is an annual gathering of more than 3,000 scholars interested in medieval studies, broadly defined. The IAS seeks session proposals that cover Italian art from the fourth through the fifteenth centuries. Members interested in putting together a panel or linked panels should send a one-page CV, a brief abstract (250 words max), session title, a short list of potential or desired speakers (they need not be confirmed), the name the name of potential chair(s) with email addresses and affiliation, and a one-page CV to the IAS Program Committee Chair. The annual deadline is April 15See our submission guidelines for eligibility requirements and instructions to propose a session for IAS at Kalamazoo.

See below for more information on currentupcoming, and past IAS participation at the International Congress on Medieval Studies.

Current Conference

2015 50th International Congress on Medieval Studies, May 14-17
The IAS will host three sessions at the 2015 International Congress on Medieval Studies.

CFP: Civic Foundation Legends in Italian Art
Organizer: Max Grossman, University of Texas at El Paso

Nearly every Italian civitas created one or more foundation narratives that glorified and advertised its origins. In Florence, for example, an anonymous writer drafted a chronicle circa 1200 that recounted the city’s ancient past and the heroic exploits of its early leaders. In the trecento, Giovanni Villani expanded upon the story and embellished it with the addition of fanciful anecdotes. Other major centers, such as Arezzo, Perugia, and Bologna, formulated similar narratives, which told of conquering Romans or the noble Etruscans before them. In the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries, civic legends—typically a conflation of history and myth—were already being promoted and disseminated through art and architecture, long before the age of Coluccio Salutati and Flavio Biondo. In cities that had actually been founded in antiquity, such artworks commonly served to enhance or exaggerate the historical truth, often with propagandistic intent. Other cities, such as Siena and Venice, were not established until the Middle Ages and thus found themselves in the difficult position of having to invent their ancient pasts. In Siena, the communal authorities adopted the Roman she-wolf as the primary symbol of the Republic by the middle of the duecento, and it was systematically replicated in painting and sculpture, including on the exterior of public buildings, until the end of the Renaissance period. The Italian Art Society will host three sessions in which scholars investigate the artistic programs of Italian cities in the medieval and early modern eras as they relate to their foundation legends. These sessions aim to advance our understanding of the interrelation between civic identity and visual culture while exploring the complex sociopolitical circumstances underlying the manufacture and propagation of historical narratives. Papers addressing questions of patronage, historiography, iconography, political ideology or cultural interchange would be especially welcome. Submissions must include: 1) a one-page abstract; 2) a completed Participant Information Form available on the website of the Medieval Congress; 3) a one-page CV.  Please submit application materials by email to the organizer, Max Grossman. Deadline: 15 September 2014.

Upcoming Conferences

2016 51st International Congress on Medieval Studies, May 12-15 
The Programs Committee is accepting session ideas and proposals in any stage of development. Members interested in putting together a panel or linked panels should send a one-page CV, a brief abstract (250 words max), session title, a short list of potential or desired speakers (they need not be confirmed), the name the name of potential chair(s) with email addresses and affiliation, and a one-page CV to the IAS Program Committee Chair by 
15 April 2015.

IAS Travel Grants
Presenters at ICMS may be eligible for an IAS Travel Grant. Graduate students and scholars within 10 years of receipt of the PhD who do not hold a tenured position may apply, even if the paper is not presented in an IAS-sponsored session. Deadline 1 November.

Other Kalamazoo Travel Grants
The Archibald Cason Edwards, Senior, and Sarah Stanley Gordon Edwards Memorial Travel Awards are available to female emerging scholars who are presenting papers on European medieval art in Sponsored and Special Sessions. Established by  founding IAS member Mary D. Edwards in memory of her parents, eligibility is limited to ABD doctoral students and those who have held a doctoral degree for no more than two years at the time of application. Applicants must be presenting papers on medieval art between 300 and 1500 in Europe, the Eastern Empire, the Holy Land, Scandinavia, or the Slavic world in either a sponsored or special session. Preference will be given to scholars whose papers treat the medium of manuscript illumination, panel painting, fresco, stained glass, woodcut, enamel, or sculpture, as well as topics involving problems of text-and-image relationships, pictorial narrative, iconography, hagiography, patronage, devotion, gender studies, and/or socio-political significance. There is one award for the 2015 Congress: $250, which will be presented at the Congress, plus waiver of registration and room and board fees. Deadline: November 1.

Congress Travel Awards for scholars from regions of the world underrepresented at past Congresses. The Congress Committee offers Congress Travel Awards to participants giving papers on any aspect of medieval studies in Sponsored and Special Sessions. The intention of these awards is to draw scholars from regions of the world underrepresented at past Congresses. These include countries of the former Eastern Bloc, Latin America, Asia, and Africa. All are eligible, with some preference towards emerging scholars. Those writing doctoral dissertations are also eligible. Award recipients are ineligible for another award until the fourth year after a successful application. There are three awards for each Congress: one award of $500, which is presented at the Congress, plus waiver of registration and room and board fees, and two awards that waive registration and room and board fees. Deadline: November 1.

Otto Gründler Travel Award with preference for Congress participants from central European nations. The Congress Committee offers the Otto Gründler Travel Award to participants reading papers on any aspect of medieval studies in Sponsored and Special Sessions. Preference is given to Congress participants from central European nations. All are eligible, with some preference towards emerging scholars. Those writing doctoral dissertations are also eligible. Award recipients are ineligible for another award until the fourth year after a successful application. There is one award for each Congress: $500, which is presented at the Congress, plus waiver of registration and room and board fees. Deadline: November 1.

Kathryn M. Karrer Travel Awards for graduate students. The Kathryn M. Karrer Travel Awards are available to students enrolled in a graduate program in any field at the time of application who are presenting papers in Sponsored and Special Sessions. There are two awards for each Congress: $250, which will be presented at the Congress, plus waiver of registration and room and board fees. Deadline November 1.

Past IAS Sessions at Kalamazoo

49th International Congress on Medieval Studies, 2014
48th International Congress on Medieval Studies, 2013
47th International Congress on Medieval Studies, 2012
46th International Congress on Medieval Studies, 2011
45th International Congress on Medieval Studies, 2010

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